ricelily:

All these pages are 8.5x11, 300 dpi. Feel free to print it out in full size if you like physical copies

Comics and Comic Artists

Jake Wyatt- deviantart tumblr

"Welcome To Summers"

"Soliloquy"

Suggested Reading/Books:

Scott McCloud’s “Making Comics” (entirely done in comic format)

Exercises/Practices/Tutorials:

Lettering

Speech Bubbles Mistakes

Paint Bucket Resource

Storyboarding and Camera angles

What is DPI?

Transferring Traditional to Digital (Photoshop Tutorial)

2 days ago
60 notes

epiphanypaige:

my comic process! a couple anons were asking about this so here you go! uvu 

sketching: anywhere from 10 minutes to 1 hour depending on the number of characters and amount of detail you put in. Generally just figuring out where everyone goes. 

inking: (can be traditional or digital) usually about 1 to 2 hours, again depending on number of characters and amount of detail. This is where the concrete forms usually come in. Can also skip this step entirely, if that’s your art style. Also includes cleaning up the lines, etc. 

flat colors: if done digitally, can range from 1 hour to 3 hours, especially if done the long way or meticulously. Just getting the colors in and making sure theyre the right shades. 

shadows: this can really vary, it can take anything from 30 minutes to 2 hours. 

effects: for me its about 10-45 minutes. This is just adding the tiny details like reflections or rain or whatever you need. Also includes final overlay for texture. 

Also I’m sorry for not using the same page as an example for all of them but I never really save the pictures of my sketches ;-;

2 days ago
49 notes

Paint tool SAI Masterpost

daa-ze:

Okay so someone i follow lost all of her custom brushes so i made a masterpost for anybody who needed it

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First i have some links:

link 1

link 2

link 3

link 4

link 5

And now full pictures i found in google a looong time ago:

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image

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And last a blog with a bunch of these:

http://ptsbrushes.tumblr.com/ (though it doesn’t update much)

erhmm…yep that’s about it

enjoy!

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(Source: kur0m, via robespierrre)

5 days ago
68,555 notes

healthfitnessfoodhumour:

12 Yoga Exercises To Get Your Thighs And Hips In Shape - source 

2 days ago
76 notes

directorlazard:

rapeculturerealities:

fuckyeahifightlikeagirl:

sweetsugaryshock:

beben-eleben:

For future reference.

Thank you.

For those who would ever need it. -C

reblogging here because i can see this being relevant to anyone who’s ever tried to get out of an abusive relationship

Reblogging because that last comment made me reread the whole thing in a new light and realize this could be vital information. So, putting it out there for everyone, and hoping no one ever really needs it.

(via blackatdp)

2 days ago
350,568 notes

Tutorial: plastic keychains

kaiami:

I know a ton of you have been waiting for this one. Teaching you to make your own plastic keychains!

To start off, I think the biggest question everyone has is what I use to make them. I work with shrink film. You might be familiar with Shinky Dink brand shrink film as a kid. I use Grafix brand white inkjet shrink film. The inkjet kind is relatively pricey compared to the regular kind. If you’re using regular, I don’t recommend you stick it in your printer. Sharpie markers would be good for that.

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Alright, now open up the file with the images that you’re working with. Make sure your images are a lot bigger than you want your finished product to be since they shrink significantly.

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You’ll also want to lighten the opacity to about half. I go somewhere between 50-60%.

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Now print your image out! I’ve found that it works best for me when I have it at the plain paper setting, and standard print quality.

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Holepunch with a 1/4” holepuncher BEFORE you shrink them. It’s so much more work to have to punch holes when your plastic is thick!

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Cut out your design, leaving the amount of border you want.

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Set them on a tray for convenience. An aluminum foil sheet works too, but I recommend cookie trays because they are easier and quicker to get out of the oven.

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Preset heat. Your shrink film package will tell you what temperature to set it at, but I find that it isn’t always accurate for me. I generally set temperature to 350 degrees or so.

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Put them in the oven. Remember to keep track of time! I leave them in for about a minute and a half.

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After time is up they should be super small! Magic!

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If your charms are not flat, put something heavy on it right out of the oven when they are still hot and malleable.

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If you’d like to, you can seal them now. In my last two batches, I used clear topcoat nail polish. The problem with that is that I need between 3-5 coats of it, and it takes a while to dry. I’ve been experimenting with modpodge.

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For lariats, you can use jump rings or lobster clasps.

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Here is one that I made that wasn’t sealed. The finished texture after shrinking is a little bit rough. There’s nothing wrong with leaving them unsealed, but because they are inkjet printed, the colors wash right of without protection.

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This is one that was sealed with modpodge. The colors become a little more vibrant and smooth and water resistant. Things often get stuck on when applying or drying so be careful.

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These ones down here were sealed with clear nail polish. They come out shiny if you put enough coats, but the grainy texture will still be there.

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Well, there ya go! Have fun making your own keychains!

(via bigfatbeckoningcat)

5 days ago
55,861 notes

dahowbbit:

goddessofsax:

Here’s a handy dandy color reference chart for you artists, writers, or any one else who needs it! Inspired by this post x

(via paradedemon)

5 days ago
239,573 notes